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DIFFICULT COMMUNICATION WITH PATIENTS

DOI: https://doi.org/10.29296/25877305-2021-12-02
Issue: 
12
Year: 
2021

Professor K. Amlaev, MD; S. Bakunts Stavropol State Medical University

The article is devoted to topical issues of communication between a doctor and a patient in difficult situations. Special attention is paid to communication with cancer patients. Recommendations for informing the patient about the diagnosis of a life-threatening disease are presented. The tactics of the doctor when conducting conversations with patients, regarding their sexual problems, as well as communication with LGBT patients are described.

Keywords: 
communication in medicine
communication about a dangerous diagnosis
communication on sexual problems of patients
communication with LGBT patients



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