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A MULTICENTRE, CLINICAL EVALUATION OF A HYDRO-RESPONSIVE WOUND DRESSING: THE GLASGOW EXPERIENCE

Issue: 
12
Year: 
2019

H. Hodgson(1), D. Davidson(2), A. Duncan(3), J. Guthrie(1), E. Henderson(5), M. Macdiarmid(3), K. McGown(3), V. Pollard(2), R. Potter(4), A. Rodgers(6), A. Wilson(7), J. Horner(1), M. Doran(1), S. Simm(8), R. Taylor(8), A. Rogers(9), M. Rippon(10), M. Colgrave(11); 1-Tissue Viability Acute and Partnerships, Glasgow, United Kingdom 2-Inverclyde Royal Hospital, Greenock, United Kingdom 3-Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom 4-Tissue Viability Specialist Nurses, Glasgow, United Kingdom -5Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom 6-Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow, United Kingdom 7-Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley, United Kingdom 8-Hartmann Wound Care, Haywood, Lancashire, United Kingdom 9-Flintshire, North Wales, United Kingdom 10-Huddersfield University, Queensgate, Huddesfield, United Kingdom 11-Molecular Cell Research, Lincoln, United Kingdom

Aim was to assess the effectiveness of hydro-responsive wound dressing (HRWD) in debridement and wound bed preparation of a variety of acute and chronic wounds that presented with devitalised tissue needing removal so that healing may proceed.

Keywords: 
debridement
eschar
Hydroclean plus
hydro-responsive wound dressing
slough



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