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MATERNAL SMOKING DURING PREGNANCY AS A RISK FACTOR FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FETUS AND A CHILD

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Issue: 
8
Year: 
2017

Professor I. Kelmanson, MD Institute of Special Pedagogics and Psychology, Raoul Wallenberg International University for Family and Child, Saint Petersburg, St. Petersburg State Institute of Psychology and Social Work

Adverse effects on the embryo and fetus in the critical periods of development can have lasting, sometimes irreversible consequences for a child. This statement is built in the so-called concept of fetal programming. Elimination of these exposures is a prerequisite to optimize the development of the fetus and child and to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality. The paper considers the most important negative effects on the course of pregnancy, the development of the fetus and child, which are associated with maternal smoking during pregnancy.

Keywords: 
obstetrics and gynecology
smoking
fetus
teratogenic effect
fetal smoking



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