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PROBLEMS IN THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF A DELAYED ALLERGIC REACTION IN THE LOCAL ANTIHYPERTENSIVE TREATMENT OF GLAUCOMA

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Issue: 
12
Year: 
2016

I. Shteiner, Candidate of Medical Sciences; S. Branchevsky, Candidate of Medical Sciences Regional Medical Center, Samara

An allergic reaction to brimonidine eye drops can manifest itself months after initiation of treatment. The resulting blepharoconjunctivitis because of a delayed reaction can be regarded as infectious, which leads to unduly antimicrobial therapy and additional deterioration of the ocular surface, more severe subjective and objective symptoms. In addition, the allergy to brimonidine may be accompanied by higher intraocular pressure (IOP), which compromises the optic nerve, especially in the advanced stage of glaucoma. Therefore, it is imperative that the allergic reaction to the drug was regarded as such; brimonidine therapy should be discontinued and IOP be immediately evaluated and corrected with an alternative antihypertensive drug regimen or surgery.

Keywords: 
ophthalmology
glaucoma
brimonidine
delayed allergic reaction



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