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PERINATAL RISK FACTORS FOR DISORDERS IN THE EMOTIONAL- VOLITIONAL SPHERE AND BEHAVIOR OF A CHILD

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Issue: 
1
Year: 
2016

Professor I. Kelmanson, MD Institute of Special Pedagogics and Psychology, Raoul Wallenberg International University for Family and Child, Saint Petersburg

The paper considers an association between poor perinatal factors and risk for disorders in the emotional-volitional sphere and behavior. It discusses whether these disorders are affected by a pregnant woman’s hormonal changes or bad habits, a number of medications, intrauterine infections, or alimentary deficit. There are data on an association of risk for the above disorders with a baby’s cesarean birth, prematurity, and/or low birth weight, birth hypoxia or trauma, and maternal postpartum depression. The possible mechanisms underlying the found associations are discussed. Preventive approaches are outlined.

Keywords: 
emotional-volitional sphere
behavior
perinatal factors



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