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IMPROVEMENT OF COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS IN HEALTHY PEOPLE

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Issue: 
12
Year: 
2015

D. Sergeev, M. Piradov Neurology Research Center

The urgent problem is today to improve cognitive functions not only in their deterioration due to this or that disease, but also in healthy people who have a high intellectual load and are forced to act in the lack of time to prepare and make decisions. Ceraxon (citicoline) is one of the candidates for intellectual stimulation. The drug has been well studied; it has safety and a proven efficacy for improving cognitive functions in healthy people.

Keywords: 
cognitive functions
citicoline
Ceraxon



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